My COVID-19 Antibody Testing Experience

The Novel Coronavirus disease has impacted the country at all levels of society, influencing and perhaps exacerbating beliefs about the value of science, importance of government, and the public’s appetite for risk. Because so much of everyday people’s understanding of the science of disease progression, and COVID-19 in particular, is not well understood by the population at large, each day new information is learned that shapes and/or fortifies earlier held feelings. And because of the availability of information that has not been vetted is written and published on an hourly basis, it may be difficult for the everyday American to carefully consider all of the important nuances in each article or news segment.

Like many others I was interested in learning if I had been exposed to COVID-19 earlier this year. I had been sick with a significant respiratory illness about the time of when the virus is reported to have first arrived in California. Because I regularly provide assistance to elderly relatives, I felt motivated to understand what my potential was for contracting and transmitting the disease. Early information indicated that the availability of testing was limited and that available COVID-19 tests would be reserved for those workers whose employment regularly interfaced with infected individuals.

With the passage of time I learned of a number of locations around Orange County, California that had COVID-19 testing capabilities. It was important that I establish baseline to learn if I had been exposed to COVID-19 to an extent that I had developed antibodies. During one of my limited trips to the supermarket I saw a sign that advertised “Instant COVID-19 antibody testing now available.” I made an appointment for the next day at 0800 when the emergency care facility opened for business that day.

When scheduling an appointment, I was pre-screened online by answering questions about why I wanted the COVID-19 test and if I believed I had been exposed. I was able to obtain the first appointment for the following morning, and upon arrival was surprised to find that I was the only customer at the facility. Because of the prominent sign advertising the availability of such a test, and the limited availability of testing, I had expected greater interest. I walked into the local emergency care facility, followed the written instructions pertaining to disease spread, and made contact with the medical receptionist. The process was efficient and involved a very limited amount of contact. I had worn an N95 face mask that I’ve had for months and the only other potential for transmission was the paper I handed to the receptionist. All of the billing questions and associated HIPPA questions were managed previously via online.

After about ten minutes, I was invited into a treatment room where I was met by a lab technician. The room looked exceptionally clean and the technician was professional. He looked for a site to draw blood and choose to use my left antecubital vein. Using and alcohol swab, proper site preparation and a small needle the technician drew a small sample of blood rapidly. When I asked about the anecdotal figures for those COVID-19 tests he noted that many of the tests were negative, specifically for Orange County. Without elaboration he seemed to indicate that the outcomes were different in other areas.


The testing that was performed was an immunoassay for suspected disease caused by the 2019 novel coronavirus, rapid SARS CoV 2 IgG + IgM Ab, QL IA serum or plasma. To the best of my understanding, this testing process attempts to determine if I have the antibodies following exposure to COVID-19. The test is designed to find antibodies for both near term, such as the last two weeks from the time of the blood draw (IgM), to long term (IgG). The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were not presented.

After about 15 minutes, I was given my result: my test was negative for COVID-19 antibodies, meaning that I was not exposed to the virus if this test proves accurate. The cost was $70.00.

This benefit of this exercise is that it forms a baseline for my exposure moving forward. Assuming I use the same cellular phone I would be able to track my movements and find when/where I am exposed in the future, if that happens. Other technological values that I do not fully understand may be used to follow my movements that could be used in the future to determine a when/where/who of a possible/suspected exposure. My experience illustrates the value of public testing and how this can be used to manage the risk regarding COVID-19 and the reopening timeline specific to state and local government.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s